Thread Rating:
  • 0 Vote(s) - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Forests and carbon capture
RE: Forests and carbon capture
Also very important: Just because the rich leave that doesn't mean the economic activity they depend upon leaves. And just as importantly, the moment they leave they become foreign actors influencing local politics, which means most of their political power leave with them.

These people are so rich they can literally afford to live anywhere they want without any issues. There's a reason they are staying, and they're unlikely to successfully extract themselves from their current residences without giving up a whole lot of wealth and power. Paying more taxes would actually be cheaper for them, even in the long run.
Reply
RE: Forests and carbon capture
Wealth has a positive feedback effect on wealth accumulation. Anyone who's ever played monopoly properly sees what happens when someone gets one or two lucky rolls early on, gets slightly ahead and then starts to run away with it.

Positive feedback is always unstable. It's basic control theory.

Taxes are a negative feedback to stabilise the system.

Unchecked capitalism is as devestating to a country, as utterly despotic communism. I can show you the mass graves of capitalism, if you'd like.

I love the smell of rotaries in the morning. You know one time, I got to work early, before the rush hour. I walked through the empty carpark, I didn't see one bloody Prius or Golf. And that smell, you know that gasoline smell, the whole carpark, smelled like.... ....speed.

One day they're going to ban them.
Reply
RE: Forests and carbon capture
(03-01-2019, 02:08 PM)Dartz Wrote: I can show you the mass graves of capitalism, if you'd like.

Actually, I'd like to see that myself so I can be better armed for debates like these.
Yasuri Nanami is my number one waifu, if only because she would horribly murder all the others if they didn't shut up and toe the line.
Reply
RE: Forests and carbon capture
(03-01-2019, 03:29 PM)Black Aeronaut Wrote:
(03-01-2019, 02:08 PM)Dartz Wrote: I can show you the mass graves of capitalism, if you'd like.

Actually, I'd like to see that myself so I can be better armed for debates like these.

You might want to come to Ireland then. Where behind many rural churches you might find a mound or quiet field where nobody has built.

There lie people who were consciously, and deliberately starved by an administration that so feared depressing the price of grain and food with state aid, and so despised anyone who should have the misfortune to find themselves laid destitute by crop failure and a landlord system that took every red penny earned to serve the idle rich who did nothing but own land for a living, that it allowed them to starve while still exporting thousands of tons of food.

And as a matter of fact, considered it the Lords work to do so.

I love the smell of rotaries in the morning. You know one time, I got to work early, before the rush hour. I walked through the empty carpark, I didn't see one bloody Prius or Golf. And that smell, you know that gasoline smell, the whole carpark, smelled like.... ....speed.

One day they're going to ban them.
Reply
RE: Forests and carbon capture
You are referring to the victims of the Irish Potato Famine?

I had believed that to be the result of widespread crop failure in Ireland compounded by crop failures elsewhere preventing food aid, rather than a more deliberate result of callous disregard for others.
Reply
RE: Forests and carbon capture
Ireland continued to export food for the duration of the famine.

Organised relief consisted of public make-work projects, such as roads to nowhere and the like, which at their worst basically worked people to death. Or workhouses which were specifically designed to be as awful and distasteful as possible so that only the absolute destitute wouild be willing to suffer their regimes. These were overcrowded, and arguably a death sentance.

The general saying is, God sent the Blight. Englan sent the famine. The potatoe was a basic subsistance crop that was destroyed by an act beyond people's control. It's an event that demands state intervention without question - a natural disaster, an act of God. No different than a flood or a hurricane. It was permitted to become a famine by the acts of men who considered a pure market more important than people's lives. And especially, Irish people's lives.

I love the smell of rotaries in the morning. You know one time, I got to work early, before the rush hour. I walked through the empty carpark, I didn't see one bloody Prius or Golf. And that smell, you know that gasoline smell, the whole carpark, smelled like.... ....speed.

One day they're going to ban them.
Reply
RE: Forests and carbon capture
And let's not forget the great Railway Strike of 1877, where workers protesting wage cuts were killed by soldiers armed with gatling guns.
Reply
RE: Forests and carbon capture
OH. You meant the mass graves of the victims of unchecked capitalism. Yeah, won't work because like you said, some of these people that I try and debate somehow think they're doing The Lord's Work - or some other BS that's just as morally bankrupt.
Yasuri Nanami is my number one waifu, if only because she would horribly murder all the others if they didn't shut up and toe the line.
Reply
RE: Forests and carbon capture
Well, I heard there's a bunker under Berlin that's something of a mass grave, but they don't let people in to see it.
--∇×v⃑
Reply
RE: Forests and carbon capture
(02-28-2019, 11:59 PM)Rajvik Wrote: Labster you literally cut off the line where I pointed out it was a political maneuver to either embarrass the deems, or make them hold solidarity with the socialist/communists in their party.

Matrix, realize that if you do that then THEY WILL LEAVE AND TAKE THEIR MONEY WITH THEM.

One question I have for that is where would they go?  Most civilized countries would tax them much more than they are here (at least currently), and I really doubt that most of the ultra rich really want to live in some place like Somalia (or for that matter even the UAE).
Reply
RE: Forests and carbon capture
(03-01-2019, 10:21 PM)Isodecan Wrote:
(02-28-2019, 11:59 PM)Rajvik Wrote: Labster you literally cut off the line where I pointed out it was a political maneuver to either embarrass the deems, or make them hold solidarity with the socialist/communists in their party.

Matrix, realize that if you do that then THEY WILL LEAVE AND TAKE THEIR MONEY WITH THEM.

One question I have for that is where would they go?  Most civilized countries would tax them much more than they are here (at least currently), and I really doubt that most of the ultra rich really want to live in some place like Somalia (or for that matter even the UAE).

Aye, there's the rub.  As long as they don't have income, they don't usually have to worry about any of it getting taxed.  In all honesty, they can easily go live someplace like French Polynesia and have enough money to live out the rest of their lives in resort-style living.  And the locals wouldn't care one bit because having someone like that living there would mean they'd need a workforce of laborers and staff for the upkeep of their lavish homes.  A lot of these folks would practically kill to have an actual job because there just isn't work available over there.

Ironically, the uber-wealthy would do people more good just living someplace else.
Yasuri Nanami is my number one waifu, if only because she would horribly murder all the others if they didn't shut up and toe the line.
Reply
RE: Forests and carbon capture
The Climate Change Paper So Depressing It's Sending People to Therapy

Have fun guys. I'll note that the paper didn't really affect my mood at all, because it's stuff I already knew. Maybe slightly improved it, because I haven't thought of resilience as a strategy. At least it's something to try besides betting on besides eucatastrophe.

It's hard to explain how you feel when you really understand the effects of climate change. I just have this profound guilt about what we're doing. All of the species that are gone, and all of the animals who have suffered. The people who have died in the Syrian Civil War, because I didn't do enough the the past decades to prevent the drought. I'm not saying it's all my fault, but it doesn't change the fact that my inaction has made me a murderer.

Rob can attest that I felt this way a few days ago, before I read the paper.
--∇×v⃑
Reply
RE: Forests and carbon capture
music cue: "In the year 2525"

Just confirms the intuitive conclusion I'd reached some time ago, really.
--
‎noli esse culus
Reply
RE: Forests and carbon capture
And it's been confirmed today that the latest Australian summer was the worst on record for weather getting its vengeance upon us, and its increasingly likely to be the new normal.
Reply
RE: Forests and carbon capture
What's worse is that Republicans will continue to put their heads in the sand, even long after Florida is a sea bed.

"Climate change isn't real! This is just how the planet works!"

"Yeah. With human involvement."

"That's ridiculous, there's no way we could have caused that! You have no conclusive proof."

"Uhm, actually? We do."

"NYAH NYAH I'M NOT LISTENING!!!"
Yasuri Nanami is my number one waifu, if only because she would horribly murder all the others if they didn't shut up and toe the line.
Reply
RE: Forests and carbon capture
Time to raid the drinks cabinet on the Titanic. See the shit that's still left before it's gone.

I love the smell of rotaries in the morning. You know one time, I got to work early, before the rush hour. I walked through the empty carpark, I didn't see one bloody Prius or Golf. And that smell, you know that gasoline smell, the whole carpark, smelled like.... ....speed.

One day they're going to ban them.
Reply
RE: Forests and carbon capture
Yeah, I've been wanting to see Venezia really bad for a about a year now (I wonder why lol), before it sinks beneath the waves. Sure, it's full of a metric shittonne of other tourists but can you blame them?
--∇×v⃑
Reply
RE: Forests and carbon capture
(02-28-2019, 08:01 AM)Epsilon Wrote:
(02-27-2019, 06:51 PM)Rajvik Wrote: Edit:Sorry Epsilon, I forgot to answer your question. Yes, I believe in the laws of Thermodynamics.  I also believe in this little thing called solar output. Want to go for another round?

Yes, actually. Thanks for anticipating my next question!

Do you acknowledge that an object which absorbs more energy than it radiates will increase in temperature, yes or no?

I suppose it would be inconvenient for me to point out that solar output has been decreasing over the last five years... but, yeah, I'll point that out anyway.

We're currently at the low end of the 11-year cycle. If it was only solar output that drives terrestrial temperatures, then overall average temperatures should have been dropping over the last half-decade. They haven't.
--
Rob Kelk

"Governments have no right to question the loyalty of those who oppose them. Adversaries remain citizens of the same state, common subjects of the same sovereign, servants of the same law."
- Michael Ignatieff, addressing Stanford University in 2012


"Don't let anyone think for you; most people can barely think for themselves."
-
Rare Earth, ending credits
Reply
RE: Forests and carbon capture
(03-09-2019, 09:51 AM)robkelk Wrote:
(02-28-2019, 08:01 AM)Epsilon Wrote:
(02-27-2019, 06:51 PM)Rajvik Wrote: Edit:Sorry Epsilon, I forgot to answer your question. Yes, I believe in the laws of Thermodynamics.  I also believe in this little thing called solar output. Want to go for another round?

Yes, actually. Thanks for anticipating my next question!

Do you acknowledge that an object which absorbs more energy than it radiates will increase in temperature, yes or no?

I suppose it would be inconvenient for me to point out that solar output has been decreasing over the last five years... but, yeah, I'll point that out anyway.

We're currently at the low end of the 11-year cycle. If it was only solar output that drives terrestrial temperatures, then overall average temperatures should have been dropping over the last half-decade. They haven't.

Now, now, Rob. Let's not jump the gun. We're still waiting for Ravjik to agree with some basic junior high physics. I'm certainly he'll be along any minute now so we can continue to discuss the science of this. We'll get to the variations in solar irradiance over the last seventy years once we've established how exactly solar irradiance effects global temperatures.
Reply
RE: Forests and carbon capture
Look, I was going to use a keyboard to come back to this but quite frankly I have neither the patience nor the energy to argue this with any of you currently. Its part of why I haven't been posting down in this area, because believe me there are quite a number of things I would love to be crowing about. I'm not doing this anymore, I'm done with the political thread.
Wolf wins every fight but the one where he dies, fangs locked around the throat of his opponent. 
Currently writing BROBd

Reply
RE: Forests and carbon capture
Okay, bye!
Reply
RE: Forests and carbon capture
(03-09-2019, 08:22 PM)Rajvik Wrote: Look, I was going to use a keyboard to come back to this but quite frankly I have neither the patience nor the energy to argue this with any of you currently. Its part of why I haven't been posting down in this area, because believe me there are quite a number of things I would love to be crowing about. I'm not doing this anymore, I'm done with the political thread.

So it turns out your earlier post was right. You're not going to ever engage in a good faith debate about this. I'm not surprised, but don't think flouncing off like a wounded dog makes you look right. 

Anytime you want to pick up your basic physics lessons, I'll be right here. With my fifty years of peer reviewed verified and scientifically tested evidence and math. Isn't the internet wonderful?
Reply


Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)